DO’S AND DON’TS

Grand Palace

Although Dos and Don'ts are important, in most part Thailand is a fun and happy culture. If you were to make some cultural inaccuracies, the Thais are mostly forgiving, especially if you are wearing a smile. *Please note: Thais don’t take well to demanding and moody people.

Please note be particularly careful about respecting Temples, Buddhism and the Thai Royal Family.

THAILAND DO’S

  • Do respect all Buddha images. They are sacred. Disrespectful acts are punishable by imprisonment.

  • Do treat monks with the highest of respect.

  • Do remove your shoes before entering a temple.

  • Do try and keep calm no matter what the problem may be. Sometimes it’s best to just walk away and enjoy your holiday. Regardless if you feel you are justified.

  • Do dress properly when visiting a temple. Eg no skimpy clothing, dress conservatively regardless how hot it may be.

  • Do try and learn a few basic phrases in Thai, like ‘hello’ - Sa what ee * Cub/Car and ‘thank you’- Cop Koon Cub/Car. 

  • Do ensure that you have a visa. Be well organised, losing a ticket or misplacing documents is very problematic and time consuming.

 

THAILAND DON’TS

  • Don’t show disrespect towards the Thai Royal Family. It’s against the law, and it is strictly enforced.

  • Don’t cross your legs or point your feet when you are in the presence of a monk.

  • Don’t touch a Thai woman without consent. The majority of Thai women are very conservative.

  • Don’t touch any Thai person’s head/hair, young or old. This doesn’t apply in the privacy of your room.

  • Don’t point your feet anywhere but downwards, don’t point to anything with your feet and don’t touch anybody with your feet. It’s considered very inappropriate.

  • Don’t be offended by questions about age, marital status or what you do for a living. These are subjects that often come up with Thais. Answering them is at your own discretion.

  • Don’t take Buddha images out of the country. It is against the law regardless if they are replicas or not, unless special permission has been granted, which can be a very challenging endeavour. I believe replicas under 12 cm or 5 inches need no permits.

  • Don’t overstay your visa.

  • Don’t drive drunk, drive without a helmet, or valid license, it’s very dangerous and illegal.

  • Don’t take illegal drugs: You can go to jail for a long time with a very large fine. This is Not where you want to be spending anytime.

Emerald Buddha
EMERALD BUDDHA

The Emerald Buddha (Wat Phra Kaew) in the Grand Palace itself is the main attraction. A figurine of the meditating Buddha made from one solid piece of green jade, clothed in gold and diamonds. It is greatly revered from the Royal family to Thai nationals alike, as Thailand’s utmost precious religious icon...

Grand Palace
GRAND PALACE

The Grand Palace once lived in by Kings is courtyards of countless majestic and all inspiring examples of exquisite Royal architecture through the millennia...

Reclining Buddha
RECLINING BUDDHA

The Reclining Buddha (Wat Pho) is located 700 meters south of The Grand Palace. It is a world-renowned 46 meter long gold plated reclining Buddha. Its pose represents entry into complete spiritual enlightenment ending all worldly reincarnations. Within the surrounding corridor there are 108 bronze bowls representing the 108 auspicious characteristics of The Buddha. It is believed dropping coins into these bowls brings wealth and prosperity...